#Runcation Reflection: Bend, Oregon (August 2014)

I was feeling a bit inspired by Oiselle to share some of my memories of last year’s runcation with two of my favorite women, Margot and Jess. I can’t believe it’s been almost a year since we took this trip. While the past 10 months have been full of pretty much the entire emotional spectrum for me, I found these photos and it brought back a wave of awesome reflection. Our runcations are always just exactly what I need. With friends, a pair of running shoes, and time to relax, I can find my center and feel grounded again. We took a trip this spring to Las Vegas, again staying in an Air BnB, with a bigger contingent of MegaTough ladies (including Christy, Leiah, and Leslie). Truthfully, I need another one of these trips, like yesterday.

A bit of backstory:

Last summer, I was able to pigeon a superfun, megatough reunion with these two awesome ladies between a week-long conference in New Hampshire and the Oiselle Birdcamp in Bend, Oregon. Margot and Jess met me in Bend, and we stayed in a lovely Air BnB house in Bend near Old Mill for a few nights. Now that we are spread out across the country (Margot is in CA, Jess is in MI, and I’m in MO for now), It was a blast being able to hang out and spend quality girl time with these wonderful women, and because they bring me such joy, I thought I’d share that joy with you.

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Lovely day on the Deschutes

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Jess and I enjoying some mountain sun before heading to the airport to pick up Margot.

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Wine, beer, and cheese. And wonderful friends.

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Margot found a local trail marathon, so decided to jump in and race. I love her mantra.

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Margot ended up cruising to the win! This is her in the beginning.

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A local #STL runner friend of mine, Amy, was also there visiting her family, and I cheered her on.

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Jess and I cruised around the trails to cheer on Margot and get some single track therapy.

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I love trails, too.

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Winner! And she got her long run in! Double bonus.

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After the race, we enjoyed a beer at Crux. This is probably one of my favorite place #inbend

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These women. Best.

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We also took a walk up Lava Butte to watch the sunset.

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The last morning that Jess and Margot were in Bend, we went for one final mountain run up the Green Lakes Trail.


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The view at the top of the Green Lakes trail was quite literally awesome.

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The Deschutes is so crystal clear, cool, and refreshing for a post-run ice bath.

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In my shoes: Managing the summer student influx in the laboratory #academia

As a post-doc, I don’t really have any of the administrative responsibilities that my mentors and colleagues that are PIs have. In general, my responsibilities include: 1) showing up for work; 2) completing project(s) sponsored by my PI’s grants (who, at least originally, was paying my stipend); and 3) publish, publish, publish. Occasionally, a post-doc is privileged with having their own funding and, potentially, more flexibility on what projects to pursue, but the end game is still: Get work done + Get it peer reviewed and published = successful.

This equation doesn’t always include the denominator of advising or mentoring other trainees. But, I’d be lying if I said that we can do it all by ourselves- or that we should even try. We need to ask ourselves: Why are we here? What is it we want from this profession? At it’s most basic level, our job as academics is to educate, whether that means educating students in the classroom, educating our peers on our research findings, or educating the public in outreach, policy, and open discourse. We are responsible for making improvements, especially intellectually. One of the ways post-docs can educate others is in the lab, with undergraduates or graduate students, with adequate training, time, research, and reinforcement of the scientific method. Think of it as a sort of “good for the realm” type approach (if you catch my Game of Thronesian reference there). What you put in, you hope to get out, and you want the next generation to be as good or better than you.

Plus, delegating responsibilities, and asking for help, can help kick-start new projects or just help knock down the mountains of work you have to do (so, it’s not a totally selfless thing after all). Assuming the help is reliable, you can certainly make great headway in your own independent approach to research- apart from your advisor- which makes getting a job after postdoctopia slightly more likely. Hello, senior author-dom!

So, the purpose of this post -which will be the first of many this summer- is to help guide young mentors (like myself) when the influx of eager and, likely, somewhat under-experienced help that has entered blazingly into the laboratory for the next few months.

Here’s a few tips that can help establish a training infrastructure for the albeit short and intense summer research session currently underway:

1. Set up regular training workshops.

When there’s one or two mentees fluttering about the laboratory, it’s usually feasible to provide one-on-one training/shadowing. That being said, there are a lot of things that newbie mentees don’t inherently know about work in the lab. And, if you have three or four trainees, you might want to gouge your eyes out after repeating that it is not ok to wear sandals in the wet lab for the seventh or eighth time. So, this summer, I started a bi-weekly training course for undergraduates and new graduate students to guide them, as a group, into what more senior academes might consider basic research know-hows. The training sessions include:

a) How to be a good lab-mate — in other words, how to keep a good notebook so that someone else can read what you spent your summer doing and repeat it, if necessary (and, it will probably be necessary). This session also includes basic lab safety stuff, like the aforementioned sandals rule and food/drink in lab, plus where you can get stuff if you need it (i.e., Where can I buy DMEM? Where can I park my bike?)

b) The literature review and managing citations — because writing for research is an entirely different animal than writing for rhetoric. This session includes a basic how-to-read-a-peer-reviewed-article, how to find said paper (i.e., picking the right key words for your research), and gives advice on how to manage references. Specifically, what are reference managers (like Mendeley and Endnote) and how can they make your life easier? This is also a brief intro to reading peer reviewed papers without stabbing your eyes out. Start with the title, abstract, and figures. If it warrants your attention, delve deeper. Know what criteria to set for triage of papers.

c) Academic writing and publishing — There comes a time when all the work you are doing is coming to an end, and you need to share what you’ve done with the general public. Or, at least, your mentor. Academic writing is a lot different than writing for, say, English composition. Write brief, concise, and clear. Make outlines first, and expand. Each word you use must have value; there’s not any room for “fluff” or filler.

d) Presenting your research to your peers — One of the most challenging things I still deal with as an academic is presenting in front of my peers. There’s just something so nerve-wrecking about it. You’d think that I train for running so that I don’t have a heart attack while presenting, because my heart-rate gets up to 170bpm before I stand behind the podium. I am not joking. Now, I’m not saying this to make all my mentees nervous; far from it. I think I would have been better served had I had more opportunities to present in front of people, had I been put on the stage, so to speak, repeatedly and often. This training workshop is probably the most beneficial of all the sessions, because whether or not your mentee(s) go on into academia, being able to present and discuss with others your aims and accomplishments is an incredibly important, and often under-trained, skill. In this session, students learn a few tips, but are also responsible for sharing, in five minutes or less, their summer research to an audience of their peers.

2. Make task lists and stay up-to-date with your mentee’s accomplishments.

It’s hard to make time, especially as a trainee yourself, for someone else’s training. But it’s crucial and it’s what we are here to do. By assigning my mentees’ to completing weekly “to-do” lists, as well as “accomplishments” lists, I am able to get feedback from them as well as give feedback to where they should be spending more or less of their time.

3. Be a reliable mentor.

Your mentee isn’t there to provide you with free labor. In return for good data, you need to provide good mentorship. That means being a reliable mentor.  Whether it’s simply showing up on time or being thorough in training your mentee a new technique, it is imperative that they are getting the most they can from your relationship. You are an educator, after all. Be accessible by email, by phone, by Google-Hangout. Don’t let them get lost in a pile of papers. Check in regularly with your mentees to make sure they’re questions are answered, and encourage them to ask questions. As a great mentor and friend of mine said at happy hour on Friday: “When you’re younger, the smart kids don’t ask questions. As you get older, the smart kids are the ones always asking questions.” 

Any other tips or tricks for dealing with facilitating productivity of summer students in the lab?

New Girls’ Club #oiselleteam

One of the first things my boyfriend (now husband) bought me was a shirt that said: “A woman’s place is on top.” While some girls may take this the wrong way, and find this a chauvinistic, sexist, or insulting maneuver from a dude they just started dating, I found it admirable. You see, the shirt was referencing the author of the book Breaking Trail, Arlene Blum, who is a mountaineer and trailblazer in more ways than just finding her way to the tops of 14,000 footers. This book was a farewell gift from my roommate and running buddy, Katie, when I left Montana. And, this book has been an inspiration to me, especially during the first few years of my PhD (and as I started training and racing marathons)- and to this day. It really drives home to me the fulfillment, the strength, and the power that comes with choosing your own route, breaking your own trail, leading your own life.

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Some big news came a few weeks ago in the world of Track and Field when Kara Goucher announced she would be joining the flock and recently signed with Oiselle. As a member of the flock, I was obviously excited, and admittedly somewhat surprised. But hearing Kara’s story, her rationale to set flight with Oiselle and leave Nike’s support of over a decade, made total and utter sense. And when Sally (Bergesen, CEO of Oiselle) dropped this one, I couldn’t stop nodding:

“We wanted to make room for powerful women on the start line of our company. After all, while we hate to admit, we’re familiar with the stereotypes…i.e., that things get messy when you have too many strong B’s at the top. And that women often tear each other down, right when we should be building each other up. One reason we find it hard to deal with the old boys’ club is that we aren’t very good at putting together the new girls’ club. I’d like to prove that theory wrong. I want to continue building the new girls’ club – where strong yet different personalities can complement rather than compete.” – Sally Bergesen, Oiselle.com

You see, whether its business, or racing, or academia, this stereotype- that women compete and tear each other down- persists. And perhaps its more than a stereotype, as hypercompetitiveness and “catty” behavior is a contended evolutionary trait. But why? I don’t have the resources to answer that question, but I do know that- anecdotally- I’ve experienced this. I’ve been a victim on numerous occasions. But what is worse: I’ve been the assailant. Oh, how I’d love to be able to say that I’ve never felt jealous of other women in similar positions, that I’ve never said something condescending about what another woman was wearing (albeit not to their face…), or performed a side-by-side comparison of another woman’s measurable accomplishments with my own (whether it were race results, papers published, or acclaim from mentors). And why? For what benefit? To make me feel better? If anything, this behavior has made me feel worse. Whatever metrics I utilized sometimes summed to me “on top”- but often, I’d find out that the other woman (or man) was better, however measurable, or stronger, or faster. And the downward spiral would progress until I felt resentment and discomfort in my own skin. And that’s ridiculous.

Fortunately, my approach in assessing myself (and others), and my accomplishments (and the accomplishments of others), has dramatically improved when I don’t pull up a side-by-side comparison. True, it’s incredibly hard to NOT pull this trick. And many aspects of life are evaluated in list-form side-by-side comparisons. Say four people are being interviewed for a single tenure-track position. Each of their strengths and weaknesses are being assessed by a committee. Or, perhaps a hundred grants are being reviewed by a committee and there’s only enough money to fund five, maybe six. This weekend, twenty elite women are toeing the line at a 5K and only one woman can win the $1,000 prize purse. Does that mean that those “losers,” the ones who won’t get that single tenure track job at this one university or win the grant or win the race are worse candidates than the others? Absolutely not. They made it there. They toed the line. Their grant was reviewed. Maybe they just missed the cut off score for funding. Maybe they came in dead last in the race. Whatever the case may be, they were there. They put themselves out there to be judged and to be assessed. By knowing humility and confidence (and when to use it), they show strength and perseverance. And it doesn’t matter what race you’re running or field you study, those there are great traits.

And lastly: It’s ok to be competitive. Competitiveness is a trait in many of us that motivates, inspiring us to do better and be better. Interestingly, comparing our own accomplishments to that of others is incredibly easy. It’s lists and side-by-side comparisons that show A is better than B. 2 is greater than 1. But guess what? Every list is always incomplete. The committee hiring for a tenure track faculty doesn’t care what your 5K PR time is. The granting agency doesn’t care how many friends you have on Facebook. Your competitors in the race this weekend give two shits if you have to prepare for upcoming job interviews*. So maybe… maybe it’s not fair to compare side-by-side. Assume your list isn’t complete; assume “their” list isn’t, either.

*unless your competitors are your friends. Then, they probably care.

Stone Fort, TN and Rocktown, GA

Here’s some pretty (awesome) photos from my buddy Erik’s bouldering trip (currently ongoing) in Southeast US.

Bouldering Montana

Not many words this time, but here’s a few more photos from the previous week in the South.  Just for you, Isaac:

Red House V7 - Stone Fort, TN Red House V7 – Stone Fort, TN

the Wave V6 - Stone Fort, TN the Wave V6 – Stone Fort, TN

Golden Shower V5 - One of the most aesthetic boulders around.  Climbs pretty darn good too.  Rocktown, GA Golden Shower V5 – One of the most aesthetic boulders around. Climbs pretty darn good too. Rocktown, GA

Iron crimps at Rocktown, GA Iron crimps at Rocktown, GA

Ruby Falls - This waterfall is INSIDE a mountain that overlooks Chattanooga. Ruby Falls – This waterfall is INSIDE a mountain that overlooks Chattanooga.

Onward to the Lilly Boulders (the Obed), TN tomorrow and then Rumbling Bald, NC the following day.

-EC

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Virtual long run- Two- #longrun #academia #runchat #oiselleteam

If we were on a long run today, I’d fill you in on the last few weeks of life. This probably won’t be too long of a long run (maybe 1.5hrs? 10miles? What do we feel like doing?) because I ran at a rate that was inversely proportional to the rate at which I consumed cheese and meat over the holidays. Like most everyone out there, December seemed like a whirlwind of events, too, and I didn’t get in all the awesome workouts and training and things I had planned. But really, it wasn’t too crazy. I ran a trail race in 8 inches of snow, I finished my first semester of teaching college sophomores, I applied for a few jobs, I traveled to Michigan for Christmas. I could probably write the “12 days of fall semester ending” song: There was 1 white elephant gift exchange, two Secret Santas, three holiday parties, four students that liked me as an instructor (if I am being optimistic), five reference letters requested, six CV updates, seven lunches and luncheons, eight dinners, nine cookies, make that ten cookies… ok fine, 12 cookies. All long runs should have some singing, right? Anyway, I digress.

If we were on a long run today, I’d tell you how relieved I am to have finished my first semester as a lecturer in engineering. Teaching was tough; it required a lot more time than I thought it would (and I went in expecting to put in more time than most college profs given that I’d never taught an entire class before), it required a lot more effort, and a lot more emotional restraint. It was both humbling and rewarding, and I am excited to teach again knowing what I know now. I didn’t expect or anticipate all the questions I was asked throughout the semester, but as we chugged along, I found my stride. It was a steep learning curve, but I definitely know what approaches to take, and what not to take, in the future when I teach again. That is, if anyone hires me… (more on that later). Have you ever taught a class? A lecture? Have you had any teachers or professors that stood out as ones you liked or didn’t like? What about them made them a good or a bad instructor?

If we were on a long run today, I’d tell you that I have officially started the tenure track (TT) faculty search. In fact, this would probably take up the whole run, so maybe I will save the majority of it for a different post. I will say, however, that this is yet another thing about academia that is not as easy as one might expect (and requires a lot more time than I thought it would). Get a fellowship, they said. It will make you a “hotter” candidate, they said. What I have gathered, in my immature and rather short experience of TT-applying thus far, is that I’m not entirely convinced that the search committees always care that much about that kind of stuff. Cool, you have funding. So does everyone else applying for TT jobs right now (or so it seems).  Nonetheless, I’m on pins and needles waiting… waiting… waiting. Because even if you submit an application on Tuesday, you want (you really, really want) some sort of “cool, thanks for applying” point of contact from a real person, not an automated email, with some sort of “you’re just what we’re looking for!” or, at least, “nah, you’re not that cool” feedback. Because, even though you really want to be that cool, you also don’t like waiting. As I’ve been told, the first round of applications for TT positions tends to be a crapshoot, (or rather in academia) “a learning experience,” and yet another way to develop thicker skin. Also, it’s a way of finding out that the search committees just aren’t that into you, as one might say. And lastly, I will tell you that the TT application process in and of itself is a lot like trying to date someone you’ve had a crush on for a while; the nervous butterflies after you put yourself out there, the checking your phone/email all the time to see if you missed a message or call, the constant sinking “oh shit” feeling that you messed something up (grammatically, of course). Oy. I haven’t dated in a while. Remember when we used to chat about dating on our long runs?

If we were on a long run today, I’d laugh at the analogies we make now that we are “older,” and obviously more mature. Seriously, there was a time when we ran for hours and talked about our crazy sorority roommate and all the f^&#ing glitter in our upstairs bathroom, or our crazy office mate who didn’t use headphones and drove us nuts, or what freshman we could find to give us a free dorm meal. What crazy stories from college (or earlier years) do you remember that got you through long runs?

If we were on a long run today, I’d tell you about the awesome race I did a few weekends ago called the Pere Marquette Endurance Trail Run. It’s a cult race, usually selling out in the first few days that registration is open (this year it sold out in 6 hrs). Fortunately, the race director threw me on the wait list and I got in after bribing him with threats of volunteering and trail cleanup. Also, Pere Marquette is (apparently) a fairly famous area of Illinois; according to my Coffee Guy (@stringbeanPete), it’s the #2 place in the late 1960s for people to go on their honeymoon. There’s loads of bald eagles flying around, and its about an hour away from St Louis City proper. I almost ditched the race because the area got about 8 inches of snow between midnight and 6am, and the roads were in horrible condition. Fortunately, Emily agreed to drive, so we picked up Irwin and we skidded our way to the PMQT visitors center to run a 7.5mile race, in snow. It was fantastic. Lots of fun, actually kind of fast because the trail was basically paved (albeit with snow). There were some slow sections (e.g., getting behind the train of runners from waves that started ahead of me) and super fast sections (e.g., running in the powder and just flying down the hills), and I wound up in second place for women behind Emily herself. We had the speedy car, apparently. Has there ever been a race that you almost didn’t show up to the start line for that was an absolute freakin’ blast to race?

The drive up.

I like running down hills, too. Photo by James Hooton

I like running down hills, too. Photo by James Hooton

So much pretty snow. Photo by Joann Fricke

So much pretty snow. Photo by Joann Fricke

SuperKate. Photo by Jim Hooton

SuperKate. Photo by Jim Hooton

The line of people.

The line of people. Photo by Joann Fricke

If we were on a long run today, I’d make a plan to have a long run again on Saturday or Sunday, because it’s 2014 now and it’s time to get back at it. Let’s think about what races we want to do this year, and chat about it in a few days, yeah?

Virtual long run – One – #longrun

A very good friend of mine has maintained a rolling blog series that she calls “Sunday afternoon virtual coffee date,” where she recaps her exciting news as if she were chatting with me (one of her many beloved readers) in real life. Jenn and I used to hang out at Rockford Coffee, or The Daily, when we were both in graduate school at Montana State. We’d talk for hours, plan our next adventure, or just study together and randomly interject with crazy twenty-something gossip. Then, very abruptly (or at least, it felt that way), we graduated and moved away from Montana. Since then, over six years has passed, and we continue to keep in touch through random visits, email, and of course- our blogs. Her coffee date posts have been a fun way for me to touch base and stay in tune with her life happenings over this past year, even if we don’t email or chat on the phone for months. And it’s been a godsend, given her crazy travel schedule over the last nine months (interviewing, moving back to Montana, traveling, adventuring, etc.).

For some reason, it has taken me nearly as long to realize that this type of blog post is something I should jump in with, too. But instead of coffee dates, as I rarely find myself hanging out at coffee shops these days, I think it will take the form as a virtual long run. This rendition was also inspired by a recent Tumblr post from haute volee Oiselle runner Fast Kate on “Notes from a long run”- so here it goes.  Lace up your shoes, let’s give it a try.

If we were on a long run, I’d tell you about the wonderful food I’ve been eating as of late. It’s necessary to get back into the long runs because of all the oil, fat, and butter that goes into the meals I eat. Given Adam’s new purchase of Thomas Keller’s “Ad Hoc at Home,” our dinners have transformed into some elegant comfort foods that are simple yet something I’ve never had before. He is really enjoying the pursuit of new adventures in the kitchen, and obviously I am supportive. His cooking style is evolving, and he’s really into learning new techniques and styles of cooking, and even in presentation too (we have special plates and bowls that make the meals look just about as good as they taste). Did I mention it’s really nice living with my husband? After being apart for over two years, I know that my life is just that much better when he’s around.

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If we were on a long run today, I’d groan a little about my decision to teach and do research this semester. Oh, and apply for faculty jobs. Teaching has been a lot of work, and one of the main reasons I haven’t been out on many long runs this fall. Teaching a new class, or a class for the first time, has a steep learning curve, but I feel like I am finally at the plateau where things in everyday teaching-life are more routine. I can predict questions and answer them effectively in class and out of class, compared to when the semester first started, when I didn’t know what the students didn’t know. And we can always improve, get better, do more. Teaching is rewarding, and demanding, and humbling, but I like it. I still prefer research primarily, but I think teaching provides a medium to connect with a younger generation and see if what you’re working towards in your career strikes a chord with them. Plus, it helps with articulating what you are trying to say, which is never a bad thing to practice in a scientist’s life.

If we were on a long run today, I’d ask you what you think of the GoldieBlox campaign for girls’ toys targeting design and engineering. The campaign on Kickstarter is incredible. There is a Rube Goldberg machine, little girls in safety glasses singing the Beastie Boys’ “Girls,” and it’s just straight-up girl power coming from 6 year olds. On the other hand, here’s a toy that is still clinging to the pink-is-for-girls stereotype. When will there be gender neutrality? And when can we stop thinking of kids as little girls and little boys and start thinking of them as aspiring engineers? A friend of mine posted a thought-provoking commentary on this. But there’s also a big gap with where we are and where we want to be as far as gender neutrality goes. And maybe it’s ok that some girls like pink things, and only play with pink toys, and aren’t interested in LEGOs, just like it’s ok that some boys want to play with dolls and kitchen things. And maybe not every kid is going to grow up and be an engineer. Whatever. If it gets the toy, made to encourage spatial visualization and design and mechanics, into the hands of a little girl because her parents only buy her pink toys or she only likes pink toys, well- that’s one step in the right direction.

If we were on a long run today, I’d ask you what good books you’ve read lately. I’ve been engrossed in the Wheel of Time novels, and because I am a slow reader, I am only on Book 6, of 14. It’s gonna be a while. So I want to know what books to get on Audible, or your cliff notes of the next best autobiography. I have a terrible habit of starting books and not finishing them, especially when I feel like I have got everything out of them that I can.

If we were on a long run today, I’d want to start planning a run-cation for next year. Where to go? What to see? I hope to be traveling a bit in the spring for interviews, but I also want to go to a few conferences, and if a race lines up with a “work” trip, that would be cool. Part of me wants to race a marathon again, just to see where I am at endurance-wise and how I can do, but the majority of myself wants to just get fast. So, I think I’ll put off the marathon for a few more years, maybe until I put together a quick, solid half marathon. Plus, I want to jump on the track for some collegiate 5K races per my coach’s recommendation (why not?). I think it would be rad to break 19, so I might as well race a few 5Ks to increase my chances. Working with a coach has been a lot of fun and very educational, and it’s a topic that could take up a huge part of our long run discussion.

Since I haven’t been on a long run in a while, I’m going to stop here, stretch, and get ready for a feast. Happy Thanksgiving!

This Gear Junkie’s guide to rockin’ a Ragnar Trail Ultra Race

Racing on trails is awesome, but running constantly for 25hrs on technical single-track between a team of 4 can get a bit tricky. Whether you’re racing on trails by yourself during the dark hours in a non-race, on a team for a Ragnar Relay, or in some wicked ultra race, there are certain things you’ll need to get you through it.

Here’s a list of my must-have items from this past weekend’s Ragnar Trail Tahoe race:

  • A high-quality headlamp: It’s gonna be incredibly tough to meander through trees, rocks, and single track without a well-lit path. Granted, the moon can shine pretty darn bright, but the chances of your race being on the same night as a full moon are confounded by potential cloud coverage and time-of-the-month.
    • Things to look for in a good headlamp are:
      • Brightness– the higher the lumens, the brighter the beam; aim for something above 50 lumens.
      • Comfort– running causes gear to do a lot of bouncing around, so make sure that the headlamp isn’t going to move around on your forehead. It’s inconvenient if the headlamp bounces off your head, and it is can be dizzying if the lamp isn’t rigid with respect to your head.
      • Weight– this kind of goes with comfort; the lighter the lamp, the less you’ll notice it. But also take into consideration what material is on the forehead-facing side of the headlamp. If there are ridges that you wouldn’t notice while wearing it over a hat, but will leave dents in your forehead when wearing it during warm summer nights, it’s probably not the headlamp you want. Some headlamps come with “cushioned” backsides, kind of like a rubber backing that you put on the bottom of chairs to keep them from scratching hardwood floors. So long as that backing doesn’t come off from sweat, somethign like that is probably going to work well, and it will keep the headlamp from slipping around your forehead.
      • Battery life– carrying extra batteries isn’t a big deal, but changing them in the dark can be difficult. Getting a lamp that is definitely going to last you through a night of running is your best bet. Most require AAA batteries, but there are a few newer ones out that are USB-rechargeable, which means lower weight and a perfect plug-in for your solar charger during the day. On that note, make sure to pick up a pack of extra batteries, use fresh batteries from the start of the race, and get lithium batteries instead of alkaline (lithium are lighter).
      • I rocked my husband’s Black Diamond Spot, which was pretty decent. I somehow lost my other headlamp, which was also a Black Diamond Spot, probably at the last Ragnar Trail race I did. Anyway, the brightness factor on the Spot was fantastic, but it did bounce around a bit more than I’d have liked, and the tighter I made the strap, the more uncomfortable it was on my forehead. Whatever, not a big deal. But, I’m looking to upgrade for next time to Sprinter by BD or Petzl’s Tikka XP2 Core.
  • An easy-to-carry- and easy to refill- hydration device: I packed my handheld Nathan bottle carry, but only carried this for the night laps when I needed more volume and somewhere to stash a candybar.
    • I ended up buying a Salomon Sense Hydro at the race from the local vendor, and I am totally geeked about it. It was super low profile, with the glove coming in three different sizes (I went with small), and the flask reducing in size as it empties. It was leakproof for me, but my teammate- Chris- bought one that had a pinhole leak  which was unfortunate. The nipple is bite-and-squeeze, and the 8-oz bladder harnessed by the straps across your palm as well as a loop around the nipple. It was also easy to refill at the aid stations throughout the course- in my opinion, it was not so far that you’d need a pack but it was too far to not take anything (especially during the daylight runs).
    • My teammates, Sean and Stephen, both used a hydration pack, both of which were low-profile. Sean refilled his between his last two loops of his final run. Stephen even went on a lap or two without a bladder in it; he just threw a bottle where the bladder goes and stuffed food in the pockets. Sean rocked the Salomon Advanced Skin S-lab Set, which made me envious. That’s on my wish list for long-ass trail runs or even my next ultra race, although I am not sure I’ll use one for a Ragnar Relay (the legs were never more than 3hrs at a time, with at least two water stops).
    • Along with carrying fluids, I hydrated like a fiend with Nuun all weekend, especially the day before and the morning of the race. Running at altitude can be tough, but it can be made a bit easier by hydrating well. In fact, I drink twice as much as I normally do before a run or a race whenever I’m at altitude higher than 6,000ft (Ragnar Tahoe started at 7500ft), and I make sure that its not just water to avoid hyponatremia.
      • Cherry Limeade is fantastic and, in my opinion, should be THE drink of Ragnar Trail races. For the early morning run, the caffeine kept me alert. I wish I had slugged it with me for the night run (I needed the boost of caffeine).  Fortunately for anyone who is racing, the Nuun gang sponsors Ragnar events (including the trail ones!), so there is an endless supply of Nuun for your bottle-filling pleasure (although they sample caffeine-free kinds, but they are still delicious!)
  • A good pair of shades:
    • Not only is a sunshade a good idea (which the GearJunkie crew brought along), a good pair of sunglasses is a must. I have been on the cusp of buying new shades for a while now; my Oakleys from 2010 in Team Trakkers green are beyond scratched, and the Tom’s sunglasses I bought for my wedding broke. So, at the airport in St Louis, I bought a pair of Maui Jim’s Sugar Beach. Sure, airport purchases are never a good idea, but the price wasn’t horrible (MSRP) and they are not knockoffs. I frickin’ love these sunglasses. And, they look fantastic, have great coverage, and are polarized. Make sure to try out your sunglasses before running on trails; sometimes, they can bounce around and might go flying off your head if you’re doing a lot of weaving in and out of trees on singletrack. These ones are fantastic; they are super light weight, grippy, flexible, and scratch resistant (Maui Jim’s prides themselves on making shades for surfers, so they are sea-water resistant. Turns out, sweat is a lot like sea water).

      Shades, handheld, tank top, and buff. All awesomesauce and ready to rock the singletrack. Photo by Gear Junkie/Sean McCoy.

  • Get a buff: Let’s be real; Sweat in the eyes is annoying. I switched between a Gear Junkies and a Salomon buff all weekend, and it kept the sweat out of my eyes. I also learned all the cool things you can do with a buff (no pun intended), like make it into a toque or headband or neck gaitor. More importantly, you can get it wet with cold water before you head out on a run so that you stay cool (also, wet your shirt/shorts with cold water to keep your temp down).  I cut off about 3 inches from the end of one to make a sweatband, which was awesome, and soaked it before both my daytime runs. Now if only I had one with birds on it…
  • Recharging station: I love my Goal0 Nomad 7 solar charging panels, and it was awesome having it to keep my phone charged. I also stole some solar juice from Sean’s bigger charging station, and the USB compatibility is awesome for digital needs. The Ragnar Trail events have Suntrap Solutions for phone charging, but if you don’t want to worry about a que and want to charge your stuff at your camp site, look into getting a solar panel of your own.
  • Dry-wicking clothes: Running three times (or 6, if that’s how you roll in an ultra relay) in 24 hrs can be pretty gross. I brought a variety of running clothes in case my shirt/shorts didn’t dry in time for my next leg, and so I had something dry to run in for the night leg (standing around waiting for the next runner in wet clothes is uncomfortable). Salomon gave Chris and I, as winners of the sweepstakes, a pair of shorts and a shirt. I also brought along a Oiselle tank and a pair of Roga shorts. The Roga shorts were clutch for the long leg, when I was out there for 3 hrs, because the pockets are huge and have zippers- I didn’t lose any of my nutrition and I didn’t lose any of my trash after eating it. The tank was long and comfortable, which kept me from getting chafed by the number belt, and it dried super fast between legs (I ran in it for two of the three legs). As soon as I was done running, I changed everything I was wearing and laid out my wet clothes to dry. Fortunately, Tahoe was dry and I could put my stuff out on the parking lot (since that’s where we camped), but it might be worth bringing something to hang your stuff on just in case.
  • Good pairs of running shoes (note the plural): I ran three times, and each time I ran in a different pair of shoes. I started with the Salomon Sense Mantra. I was hesitant to run in these shoes, because they kind of reminded me of a “grandma-walking-shoe,” but after doing a lap with a lot of sandy downhill sections, I was impressed. My only complaint was, because they were a minimalist shoe, there wasn’t a lot of support in the forefoot for steep downhill terrain. But, that’s not what they are made for; they are a good all-around singletrack shoe. It’s pretty damn hard to find a shoe that’s made for downhill. I ran my midnight lap in the Brooks Cascadia 7. As much as I love Brooks, I finally realized in this race that the Cascadias are not for me. I ran in them at Leadville when pacing a MegaTough teammate, and I’ve run in them tons on singletrack in Michigan and Missouri, but I always seem to roll my ankle. I think I need a lower profile shoe for trails. Anyway, my third lap, I ran in the Salomon Fellcross 2, which comes out in September. These were, hands down, the best show I’ve run in on trails. Super grippy, super light, and they hugged my feet perfectly. There was no toe-smushing, or slipping feet on descents, and there were no rolled ankles. And along with the shoes, don’t forget socks: I wore a different pairs of Merino blend socks from Fitsok on each leg, and the ISW were my faves.
  • Camp-site essentials:
    • Ice
    • A cooler with cold drinks (including cola, coffee [like Starbucks DoubleShot], and maybe even beer)
    • Calorie-dense snacks (Picky bars, almond butter, chocolate, you know- the good stuff).
    • A piece of paper or a spreadsheet to write down lap times, to keep you and your teammates sane (so they know when to wake up, mostly). The ultra team offers less flexibility; at least in the regular team, the person running two legs before yours can wake you up when they hand off to the runner that’s before you.  With an ultra, you can still do that, but you could be up for about 3+hrs before its your turn to run. Having an estimated time to run is nice for extra shut-eye, especially when the miles add up.
    • A large towel (to dry off with, to clean up with, to sit on the ground with, to wipe your face with, to keep yourself warm at night with, to take swimming, whatever, you’ll need it)
    • A camp chair
    • Pitch your tent in a shaded spot or bring along a shade tent (your tent will get hot)
  • And of course, last but definitely not least, camping gear:
    • Tent– I’ve had a two-person lightweight tent for years that I bought from Cabela’s. Their stuff is made just as well as the “brand name” stuff, but it’s significantly cheaper. I have an older version of the XPG 2-person tent, and it is super easy to put up (takes me by myself less than 5 minutes) and it is easy to keep organized inside. If you’re car-camping, then a bigger, heftier tent would probably be fine, but if you have to fly to the race, go for a lighter tent (that is easy to pack in your luggage). Depending on your teammates, you can coordinate sharing a tent as well; Three GearJunkie folks slept in one tent (albeit, it was a 6 person tent). There’s no reason that everyone needs to bring their own tent, especially if you don’t mind getting close with your teammies.
    • Sleeping bag– Again, I have a Cabela’s XPG bag (15degrees).
    • Sleeping pad– this is essential, especially if you find yourself in a situation like we had at Tahoe where the camp site is under construction and the racers have to set up camp in a parking lot. I have a Thermarest, some teams brought blow-up air mattresses, and the Gear Junkie guys even off-the-shelf’d some pads from Walmart (which, as it turns out, were pretty crappy). Both for comfort and for keeping the heat in, definitely bring a sleeping pad with.

Have you done a trail relay or a trail stage-race before? Did you race as a regular or an ultra team? What gear did you find to be essential for surviving the weekend?

Finding my flock

Oiselle Badge_150px

I found out yesterday morning that I was officially accepted for the Oiselle Volée team.

For over the last year, I have been getting back to my roots in running, focusing on trying to reconnect, improve, and rediscover my drive to be better. Better at what, exactly? Well, better at racing, for sure. I took a few years off, as is habit for me I suppose, after ending graduate school and starting my post-doc. It was a tough few years, and it took a while to get into the swing of things, but I’ve been able to find support and encouragement from others to look ahead and see my potential. Besides, who doesn’t want to be better, stronger, faster? But I’m also striving to be better in a lot of other ways, too- like, better at balance. Sure, I want to be a better balanced runner– meaning, I want to actually be able to stand on one foot and then the other without falling over, and I want to feel strong, grounded, and connected with the earth. Better balance in the literal, tangible sense of “yoga-and-closed-circuit-exercises”-sense. But I have also been striving to find better balance between work and “life” things, better balance in – more importantly- life outside of work. I started rock climbing and strength training again, after several years hiatus, and I tag along with my husband when he goes to the trails to ride his bike, so that I can run on singletrack and hills and sand, so that I can get better and stronger and fitter. I eat better, thanks to my husband who prepares gourmet meals as if I am an athlete in the Tour de France and he’s my amazing chef. I even think better; improving my positivity and thinking ahead at my potential instead of dwelling on my shortcomings.

So, when I found out that Oiselle was bringing on some more ladies to the flock this year, I was quick to apply. It was easy for me to apply; the questions in the application were honest and my answers were honest, and the mission of the company is one that I’ve adored for years. In 2009, when my former collegiate teammates and I officially formed Team Mega Tough, I found Oiselle to be the perfect reflection of us; strong, ambitious women, brought together through running, who’ve made the most lasting friendships and have experienced the most remarkable things through each other’s accomplishments. With Team Mega Tough, and now Oiselle, it’s not about me- it’s about the flock. Sure, I want to do better for myself, to race faster and be stronger and have the most amazing balance (can I stand on my head? ok, maybe I don’t really care to do that)… but more importantly, at least to me, I want be there when others in my flock do their best. I want to be the one my teammate calls when she PRs in the 10K after not racing in a few years; when she decides she want to run her first marathon and calls me just to tell me she signed up. When an email chain between five women goes around about running a relay as an ultra team, which means we’d all run more than a marathon- and their first response isn’t: “WHAT? That’s stupid.” It’s: “WHAT? Where do I sign up?” When a friend tells me she wants to race the Leadville 100 mile run, and that she wants to win it, I’m not going to call her crazy; I’m going to buy a plane ticket to Denver and crew for her, pace her until I puke my guts out at 11,000ft above sea level. These are things I enjoy more than racing itself, but these things revolve around running, they are defined by running. And these are things that add up to way more than anything I can accomplish on my own. Running is an individual sport, but there’s so much more to it than doing it all on your own. It’s the meet-up runs in cities while traveling, its the destination races with friends to see more of the country, it’s the 3hr run “just-because” with friends you haven’t seen in months, it’s the bachelorette parties that revolve around trips to islands just to run. Running is at the center, but we flock around it like birds to a lake. It’s about having a team of women that support each other, and I’m proud to say that I run for Oiselle.

Sunrise to moonrise and back again: Racing Ragnar Trail Tahoe with Team @TheGearJunkie

It’s 2AM and it is taking all the concentration I have to keep my eyes open. I’m on my fourth of six laps in total, my second time on the trails. 19 miles down, 15 to go. I have to convince myself to stay alert, to look for rocks, to pick my feet up. Keep moving. Down the fire road. The faster you get down this mountain, the sooner you can sleep. But really, I could sleep right now. I could curl up alongside the trail and just. Sleep. The descent becomes more dizzying, my eyes continue to accrue mass, my mind is heavy and a blur. It seemed like hours by the time I made it back to transition; my watch battery had died and I was out of water. With my teammate’s worry replaced by relief, I crawled into my sleeping bag for a few hours of shuteye before my last laps.

This weekend, I raced the Ragnar Trail Relay in Tahoe as an honorary Gear Junkie team member on their ultra team. I won a sweepstakes in May for an all-expenses-paid trip to Reno and registration to the Ragnar Relay, as well as a plethora of amazing running gear, thanks to Gear Junkie, Salomon Running, and Suunto.

Pew pew! This way to the awesomest team at Ragnar Trail Tahoe.

My teammates included, in pseudo-reverse running order, Mr. The Gear Junkie himself, Stephen:

Team captain, Stephen, prepping for his first two laps.

Firepants McCoy, AKA Sean:

Dude is fast.

 And of course, Chris, who also won the contest:

Fooled you. This isn’t Chris (it’s Salomon runner, Theodorakakos Dimitrios). Photo by Salomon Running

LOL. Fooled you again. This isn’t Chris either, it’s Salomon runner, Kilian Jornet. Photo by droz-photo/Salomon Running

This is Chris. For real. Photo by Sean McCoy/Gear Junkie

and of course, myself:

Cruising the singletrack like a boss. Photo by Ragnar Trail Relay

I wasn’t the only girl in our Gear Junkie camp, though. Amy came along as logistics coordinator/beer-and-cheese-balls wrangler, which was an invaluable service when you have an entire team made of native Midwesterners. She even jumped in as pacer for a lap, although who wouldn’t when the loop started with a ride up a chair lift?

Amy and Sean doing actual work, particularly on the cheese balls.

We convened on Reno on Thursday night, with Sean and Stephen on the same flight as me out of Phoenix, and Chris meeting us in the smallest big city after a could-have-been-better flight out of Milwaukee/PHX. After harnessing the power of the Awful Awful burger and contemplating a climb up the side of a building (which was actually encouraged), we swung by Walmart for some essentials (coffee, beer, and cheese balls, obvi) and then… finally… rolled onward to the Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort. Setting up camp at midnight made us feel a little like assholes, until another party arrived around 3am to do the same thing, only with inflatable air mattresses. Approximately three hours of sleep later, it was up and at ’em for an action packed day of hydrating, eating yellow #5, and enjoying the entertainment of enthusiastic athletes in costumes.

Setting up camp, with a view that wasn’t half bad.

Our start time was 2:30pm, and Chris was reeling to go. We got the low-down from Ragnar Trail Blazer, Steven, as usual:

This dude is legit. He MC’s for hours on end, while us weenie athletes sleep between our laps in our tents and stuff our faces with s’mores and Nuun.

Ready…. SET… Ahooooo!!! There’s Chris on the edge of the shot.

The three loops, Green-Yellow-Red, were done in order over and over (G-Y-R-G-Y-R… etc) until everyone runs each lap once, or twice in our case since we were an ultra team. That meant that Chris’s first leg, totaling two laps, was Green-Yellow, with Green being 2.6mi up the bunny hill and back down a steep sandy grade, and Yellow being a 6.7mi grueling fire-road climb with a fast descent down a fantastic singletrack. All trails converged with 0.5mi remaining, which was a steep and tough climb, and Green/Yellow converge with about a mile left. So, there was some overlap between loops, but each loop was distinct in its own way.

Leg 1: 4:30-6PM:

I started my first run of the weekend’s race in the Salomon Sense Mantras on the red loop, which meant I got to ride the chair lift to the top of the mountain (at 9,000ft) and run down. Or at least, I thought I’d get to run down. There was a fantastic jaunt across the top of the mountain for about two miles before the descent began, and when it did, it was on fast fire road for a solid 4 miles. I was hauling. The miles ticked off quickly at 6:30min/mile pace, and I was sure that I’d put us in a good position heading into the night laps. But then the descent ended, and I found myself climbing up singletrack, with sun blazing and legs and lungs burning. It all balanced out, and I got back through transition and onward to the Green lap. I didn’t know quite what I was getting into, so I took the climb up the bunny hill conservatively. It reminded me a lot of running up Ripley, with the sun beating down, the exposure and sand and lungs burning. When the trail split between Yellow and Green, I followed the Green downhill, and fast. I was unsure how the Salomon Sense Mantra would handle the sandy and steep terrain, but damn if I didn’t run in these shoes much before the race.  I felt like I was flying down the side of a cliff face like a mountain goat. I was connected to the earth, but didn’t roll my ankle or feel sluggish. I felt fast.

I cruised into the last mile’s arduous false flat into the finisher’s climb, turned the corner and let loose down the hill, handing off the race belt to Sean as he cruised through the longest two laps (Y-R). I knew that I still had a lot of miles to get through, but I was happy to find myself feeling ok with the altitude. My next lap wouldn’t be for several hours, so I got some food, shade, and water and relaxed until the time came.

Leg 2: Midnight – 3AM:

I threw on a pair of Cascadias and and rolled out of transition a little after midnight. In hindsight, I should have napped, or at least scored some caffeine an hour or so before my night run started. The first loop of my second leg was Yellow, followed by Red; Yellow was faster than I expected, given that the first half is an incredible climb up fire road that included switchbacks but was mostly just straight up the side of the freakin’ mountain. I think it helped to do this lap first at night, as opposed to during the day when you could see exactly where you were going; I knew I was climbing but I didn’t know just how steep it was, or how much longer I’d have to go. Eventually I turned onto singletrack and got a little unnerved by cracking branches in the woods; some other runner probably tripped or stumbled, but I took it as some other bear or cougar is out to eat my face. The adrenaline went through me a little too early, and I cruised through the lap on time. It wasn’t until I got to the chair lift for the second time on the Red loop that I realized just how euphoric this experience truly was. I stopped running, wrapped up in the blanket, and sat on the chair, lifting me up up up the side of the mountain. I turned off my headlamp, and the moonlight reflected off the boulders below me. I ate a Snickers and put my feet up, in awe of the stars and the moon, and then the tiredness hit me.

As I got off the lift, I highfived the lifty and flicked my headlamp back on. I careened around the top of the mountain, but by the time I got to the descent, I knew something was off. The Snickers didn’t do it for me, and I started fading fast. It took all the concentration I could muster to keep my eyes open, to stay alert. I passed a few runners and could barely get out a gruntly “great job.” My feet hit the ground so heavily, and my ankle turned a few times. I was ready to be done, but the descent just kept going. I didn’t remember it being so long the first time. Eventually, I made it onto the singletrack, where my GPS watch battery died, but knew that I just needed to get back to the road; the road meant there was less than a half mile to go.

Arriving back at camp, I handed off to Sean and forced myself to grab a banana and almond butter. I ate it while crawling into my sleeping bag, and was asleep before my head hit the sweatshirt pillow.

Leg 3: 10:30AM- 12:30PM

I was up and moving by 6AM, but felt like I had slept for days. I grabbed a coffee, threw on a loaner pair of Salomon shoes from Josh and the Salomon gang (I tried the Fellcross 2), and gathered myself for a hot, late morning run, and waited. Other teams had started doubling, and tripling, up their laps; if there were more than two runners left that had Green loops to run, they were to run together in order to complete the race by 6PM. As an ultra team, this was not that feasible, but we weren’t too concerned about finishing on time- the projections still had us finishing at or around 4PM.

Snagging a pair of demo shoes from Salomon.

Feet up, resting, waiting for Chris to finish his final leg (and rocking the new Fellcross 2)

Chris cruised through transition and handed off the race belt, and I soared through the Green Loop just 2 minutes slower than my first go at it. And I felt good; I was trying to hold myself back so I didn’t blow up on the Yellow, but I also wanted to use my strengths (false flats, downhills) when I could.

The Yellow Loop’s grinding climb was not as runnable the second time as it was the first; I think because I could see just how onerous it was. I ski-walked to the best of my ability, and once I got onto the single track, cruised and ate a gel. The singletrack on the last loop of the race for me was the most awesome singletrack I’ve run on in a while. Up and over boulders, over logs, under logs, across riverbeds, flowing trail that was so well designed and fast. And the Fellcross were an amazing shoe; so light and grippy, low to the ground, and I didn’t have any rolled ankles. By the time I got to the fire road at the end of the singletrack, I tried to put the hammer down. I knew I had just about 2 miles left, and 2 miles is not that far. My legs burned, my quads just ached, but one foot in front of the other got me to transition.

Lap time estimates to guide us in predicting the next runner’s arrival time.

Sean and Stephen both cruised through their last legs, just absolutely flying. Amy, even with fresh legs, couldn’t keep up with Stephen on his last lap of 7.7miles on the Red loop. As he came around the final turn down the hill toward the finish chute, we hopped up and hit the trail behind him, crossing the line around 4PM.

All in all, the weekend was a fantastic blast. I was able to meet up with my teammie, Margot, in South Lake Tahoe for a swim and a burger, and the crew and I enjoyed a sunset over the mountains. We got back to camp and the party wasn’t completely dead, so we hung out with another team playing Flippy Cup and drinking Coors Light. Staying the night after the race is the way to go, for sure.

Doing a trail relay as an ultra team is my cup of tea. It’s fun either way, but I like the extra miles and the challenge of keeping my head in it. It’s not as hard on the body to do the trail relay as an ultra as it is, say, doing the relay as an ultra on the roads. Trails are just easier on the bones, but may be harder on the lungs. The trail relay teams are smaller than the road relays, too, which is seemingly easier to organize and manage. I am really looking forward to doing more of these, and am grateful for the opportunity to race with the Gear Junkie team at this year’s Tahoe race.

Special thanks to Salomon Running and Suunto for the amazing gear; the Sense Mantras are a fantastic trail shoe that is light with excellent traction, and their clothing is comfortable and wicking. I ran in the Start trail running shorts for two legs, and never had any chafing or rubbing. I also purchased a Salomon Sense Hydro S-Lab handheld, which was fantastic to use (and incredibly lightweight!). Suunto really hit the nail on the head with the Ambit2S- I absolutely love this watch and I don’t even know how to use it to the best of its abilities. And last but not least, thanks to Gear Junkie for picking me to be on your team. What an honor! I look forward to racing with you guys again!

Training update: 9 weeks until race day

Today marks 9 weeks until my goal marathon, the Fox Cities Marathon in Appleton, Wisconsin. Training is ramping up, and I even hired a coach(!) which I will talk about at a later date. Fox Cities will be my first marathon in nearly 3 years; the last one I did was the Detroit Free Press Marathon in October, 2010. I mildly trained for the Rock and Roll St Louis last year, but bailed on the full and raced the half instead, which was the first half marathon I’ve ever raced (and it was super fun, by the way).

I decided to register for the Fox Cities race because it seemed like a great time to run a marathon (late September), and I’ve heard wonderful things about the course and race. Now that I will be teaching an undergrad engineering class in the fall, I am a little less sure it will be a great time to run a marathon, but hopefully life doesn’t get too crazy.

Speaking of crazy: Remember how I won a rad contest through Gear Junkie for a Ragnar Relay entry and a bunch of sweet stuff from Salomon and Suunto? Well, I’m now less than one week out from the Ragnar Trail Relay in Tahoe, and I’m getting pretty excited. I found out early last week that the team assembled by Team Gear Junkie (which includes me) will be doing the relay as an ultra, which consists of 4 people instead of the “regular” 8. That means a total of 34 miles in a 24 hr period, which is the most I’ve done in … a long time. And it’s all on trails! Bangarang. Fortunately, I don’t feel completely underprepared; I’ve been training with higher mileage and on trails, so that’s a win. This weekend, I enjoyed some quality time on trails in Lost Valley. It was hot, humid, and full of awesome, and it made for great training. I felt surprisingly great, which was an extra bonus, although I do feel a little under the weather today.

Splendid singletrack.

The best post-run snack.

Other than the trail run, this week’s training has been a bit low-key, but I did get in a semi-quality track workout on one of the hot evenings (oh, right; it’s July in Missouri, and they are all hot). I leave Thursday for Tahoe, and I’ve been popping zinc for some added insurance that I don’t get sick before flying across the country and sleeping at altitude for the weekend. One of my MegaTough teammies, Margot (who flew to Missouri for my birthday to run 30 miles over the weekend with me), will be joining me in Tahoe, too, to hopefully add in one more run for the weekend on Sunday. Add that to a swim in a cool mountain lake, and I think it will be one of the most fantastic weekends of the year.